And to my dismay I can’t grasp why this is also my first. I searched my blog’s archive and I was surprised to find out that I have not written a single review about any of the movies or books. All my HP related entries were mainly promotions for the movies. In this case I will pour out everything into this one post. As some of you may have, I came to know Harry Potter through the first film, Sorcerer’s Stone in 2001. I was in high school back then and I can still remember how the fascination for this cute, wide-eyed, bespectacled, wizard boy with a lightning scar on his forehead exploded; I’m telling you most of my classmates’ notebooks were covered with cut-out pictures of him and even had posters on their bedroom walls. That time I wasn’t particularly interested, eventually I got more curious when Chamber of Secrets premiered but still I regarded it as children stuff. I knew then there were books from which they were based upon but it wasn’t until Prisoner of Azakaban in 2004 (one of the best both in movie and novel aspects) where I really started following and got the urge to read the novels. But being a late-bloomer when it comes to reading (in everything more like it) and by that I mean it wasn’t until 2008 where I picked up my first novel (Twilight) and since then regularly visited bookshops and carried with me a book almost everywhere I go. Going back, this was when Sirius Black came into the picture and the theme got evidently dark. I especially enjoyed the “time-turner” portion of the story. I wished then that Hogwarts was real and somehow a Hagrid-like character would barge in one day at our house to tell me that I was a wizard and that I didn’t belong in the muggle world (hehe). Then Goblet of Fire came and I was a huge fan already. I was eagerly anticipating its release and if I remember it right I even watched on the first screening. I loved the idea that there were other magic schools and the Tri-wizard tournament was the highlight of that year. 2007 brought along Order of the Phoenix and I was obsessed; I knew all the characters, memorized the spells/magical objects, cheered on Quidditch – to think I still haven’t read the books. This was when the rebellion went in full swing and things started heating up. Suddenly it wasn’t so much about school since You-Know-Who was back.

And then it was time, I finally got the novels. It’s a bit weird since I bought first the last 4 books. The reason was I couldn’t find a hardbound copy of the first one – yes it had to be in hard cover and besides I don’t think my pocket can handle buying all at once 😀 . So I decided since I wanted to finish up to the last book before the last of the movie installments come out. That was when I realized how the books are so much more intricate and amazing and magical – yes that’s the word, magical. It truly is. You might say, “Well that’s because they’re wizards moron”. But it’s not so much because they have wands and can conjure spells or that they use owls to send out mails and fly on brooms but more of how the world was created and thought of; how it all came together and laid out. I am astonished on how the idea of this boy came to Rowling while riding a train to London. By the time Half-blood Prince was in cinemas I gobbled up the entire set including the first 3. Dumbledore died in this chapter of the series and his past was uncovered. Indeed, a chaotic time in the wizarding world. It was my first time to watch with the story in mind so normally I had moments where I said, “hey, that’s not how it happened” or “that wasn’t in the book”. Overall it was still a good interpretation. Generally, the books are usually superior but over the years the Harry Potter movies were some of the best adaptations from a literary work. The tweaks in the story here and there are necessary to properly translate it into a visual piece, smooth out the narration and of course, fit it into roughly more than 2 hours of screening time.

The epic finale was divided into two parts and it is a warranted decision for the producers because there is no way it could fit into one; so much would’ve been compromised. Although the Deathly Hallows novel was introduced in 2007, you still have something to look forward to that’s why I couldn’t believe it was truly the end when both installments came out. Reading it, I cried as the conclusion drew closer and page by page all questions are answered. I started sobbing practically when Harry, upon seeing Snape’s memories through the pensieve, discovered he needed to die to destroy Voldemort. I was stunned, I couldn’t accept it. I even loathed how Dumbledore and Snape were portrayed differently afterwards like the roles switched. Albus was not altogether innocent and Severus was, in a way, a brave hero. But I’ve learned to accept it, that’s how emotionally attached I am. The darkest moment was the battle at Hogwarts especially when some of our beloved characters died. The film was just as engrossing. I’m in full praise to David Yates because I can only imagine how difficult it must’ve been to stay true to the novel and please the fans. I can say that it was a masterpiece both visually and in storytelling. In the end, the good prevailed. It always does. I think the epilogue was also like cherry on top of ice cream. I appreciated that Rowling didn’t leave the story of our threesome open-ended. If I can just say though, there’s still a part in me that wishes that it should’ve been Hermione and Harry together but I love Ron so it’s fine. Lastly, I want to thank J.K. Rowling because although Harry Potter was not exactly a part of my childhood it sure brought out the kid in me again and it felt good. It was a wonderful sort of journey going through all the books and movies throughout the years. Let me end this post with the last words in the novel that I thought was just beautiful: “The scar had not pained Harry for nineteen years. All was well.” (sniff sniff) 🙂

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